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Wednesday, August 5, 2020 | History

2 edition of Thermal comfort in passive solar buildings found in the catalog.

Thermal comfort in passive solar buildings

Arthur I. Rubin

Thermal comfort in passive solar buildings

an annotated bibliography

by Arthur I. Rubin

  • 267 Want to read
  • 9 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Commerce, National Bureau od Standards, National Technical Information Service, distributor in Washington, DC, [Springfield, VA .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Temperature -- Physiological effect -- Bibliography.,
  • Solar heating -- Bibliography.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementArthur Rubin ; sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Solar Heat Technologies, Passive and Hybrid Solar Energy Division.
    SeriesNBSIR -- 82-2585 (DOE), NBSIR -- 2585 (DOE)
    ContributionsUnited States. National Bureau of Standards., United States. Dept. of Energy. Passive and Hybrid Solar Energy Division.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationix, 72 p. :
    Number of Pages72
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17656384M

    Solar shading Among all other solar passive cooling techniques solar shading is relevant to thermal cooling of buildings especially in a developing country owing to their cost effectiveness and easy to implement. Rural India and developing countries in Middle-east region has witnessed a steep rise masonry houses with RCC roofs. In order to create thermal comfort conditions at the interior of a building, passive cooling techniques need to be designed at three levels i.e. protection of heat gain, modulation of heat gain.

      The building was designed with sustainability and natural light in mind. It included energy efficient plate glass windows for passive solar heat and indirect light and a curved shape to capture the maximum amount of sunlight. These and other sustainable construction practices helped the building achieve a LEED Platinum certification. What we do Research and knowledge DEIC Basic Book Thermal comfort Thermal comfort with roof windows and solar shading Thermal comfort with roof windows and solar shading Windows combined with a heat source (e.g. a fireplace) are one of the oldest methods of achieving thermal comfort in buildings during cold periods.

    The last two columns looked at how ‘best practice’ for thermal comfort in houses, typified by ‘passive solar’, has failed to gain more traction and reach its promise of better thermal. This research tries to explore more about thermal comfort of residential buildings in Kathmandu and the ways of improving it using passive design strategies. The provision of certain desired level of thermal comfort is one of the primary reasons of.


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Thermal comfort in passive solar buildings by Arthur I. Rubin Download PDF EPUB FB2

The idea of improving the thermal comfort of lightweight buildings by integrating PCMs into the building structure has been investigated in various research projects over several decades.

The option to microencapsulate PCM, a key technology that overcomes many of these problems, may make PCM products accessible for the building industry [26]. Get this from a library. Thermal comfort in passive solar buildings: an annotated bibliography.

[Arthur I Rubin; United States. National Bureau of Standards.; United States. Department of Energy. Passive and Hybrid Solar Energy Division.]. Current thermal comfort models and standards are premised on conditions of thermal equilibrium between the building occupants and their indoor climate.

Such standards are therefore not intended for use in passive solar buildings where indoor climatic conditions vary both spatially and by: 9.

This book covers the fundamentals of the science and architecture in solar passive building, showing how optimal mass, insulation, orientation, shape, built form and layout play their role in the design process.

Contents: Thermal comfort. Climate, solar radiation, building orientation and shading devices. Building clusters and solar exposures. There are two key lessons from this book. Firstly, thermal comfort is individual.

Passive solar design plays a key role in building conditioning; essentially it is a way of gathering, storing. Materials for energy efficiency and thermal comfort Thermal comfort in passive solar buildings book buildings critically reviews the advanced building materials applicable for improving the built environment.

Part one reviews both fundamental building physics and occupant comfort in buildings, from heat and mass transport, hygrothermal behaviour, and ventilation, on to thermal comfort and. The present paper describes the development of a solar passive system, which can provide thermal comfort throughout the year in composite climates.

In the first phase, passive model 1 comprising two sets of solar chimneys was developed and monitored for its performance for 1 complete calendar year. A 11 ID 2 NBSIR (DOE) Thermal Comfort in Passive Solar Buildings -- An Annotated Bibliography U S.

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Bureau of Standards National Engineering Laboratory Center for Building Technology Washington, DC October Sponsored by: U.S.

Department of Energy m *ice of Solar Heat Technologies isive and. These are selected in such a way as to encompass both a number of buildings with passive solar features (primary focus) and a control group of non-solar buildings. Analysis of results from non-solar buildings shows that comfort temperatures are dependent upon context, and not only upon clothing insulation and activity level.

Griffiths, I. () Thermal Comfort Studies in Buildings with Passive Solar Features. Field Studies. Report to the Commission of the European Community, ENS35 UK. has been cited by the following article: TITLE: Variable Thermal Comfort Index for Indoor Work Space in Office Buildings: A Study in Germany.

AUTHORS: E. Kuchen. Passive solar technologies use sunlight without active mechanical systems (as contrasted to active solar).Such technologies convert sunlight into usable heat (in water, air, and thermal mass), cause air-movement for ventilating, or future use, with little use of other energy sources.A common example is a solarium on the equator-side of a building.

Comfort, climate analysis and building design guidelines. Givoni B., Energy and Buildings, 18 () Adaptive thermal comfort and sustainable thermal standards for buildings. Nicol J.F. and Humphreys M.A., Energy and Buildings pp Get this from a library. Thermal comfort in buildings with passive solar features: field studies.

[I D Griffiths; Commission of the European Communities.]. Thermal comfort is the condition of mind that expresses satisfaction with the thermal environment and is assessed by subjective evaluation (ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 55).

The human body can be viewed as a heat engine where food is the input energy. The human body will release excess heat into the environment, so the body can continue to operate. What we do Research and knowledge DEIC Basic Book Thermal comfort Building types and climate Building types and climate.

Many of the considerations in the Ventilation chapter on building types and climate also apply to thermal comfort. In these cases, passive technologies, such as solar shading and natural ventilation, are often not.

Solar thermal is now a proven technology in terms of reliability, cost-benefit, and low environmental impact. The integration of solar thermal systems and installations into the design of buildings can provide a clean, efficient and sustainable low-energy solution for heating and cooling, whilst, taken in a wider context, contributing to climate protection.

DOI: /_30 Corpus ID: Field Studies of Thermal Comfort in Passive Solar Buildings @inproceedings{GriffithsFieldSO, title={Field Studies of Thermal Comfort in Passive Solar Buildings}, author={Ian D.

Griffiths}, year={} }. Passive solar heating and passive cooling—approaches known as natural conditioning—provide comfort throughout the year by reducing, or eliminating, the need for fossil fuel. Yet while heat from sunlight and ventilation from breezes is free for the taking, few modern architects or builders really understand the principles involved.

Now Dan Chiras, author of the popular book The Natural Reviews: 2. 1 Passive Heating: Using building design to harness solar radiation and capture the internal heat gains is the only passive way to add free thermal energy to a building. Passive solar heating combines a well-insulated envelope with other elements that minimize energy losses and harness and store solar gains to offset the energy requirements of.

In passive solar building design, windows, walls, and floors are made to collect, store, reflect, Providing thermal comfort is one of the vital requirements of buildings. comfort.

Utilizes passive solar gain when the building is in heating mode. Minimizes solar gain when the building is in cooling mode thr ough orientation, shading, and glazing selection.

Facilitates natural ventilation wher e appr opriate. Has good solar access if use of solar thermal or photovoltaic (PV) systems is anticipated.Thermal Comfort. The alternative to the air-tight, sealed box building arebuildings that can be opened and interact with their environment and provide better comfort conditions while reducing the dependence on energy intensive HVAC systems.

The issue of providing thermal comfort in buildings has been always a major issue in building design.the well-designed home. Passive solar design can reduce heating and cooling energy bills, increase spatial vitality, and improve comfort.

Inherently flexible passive solar design principles typically accrue energy benefits with low main-tenance risks over the life of the building. DESIGN TECHNIQUES Passive solar design integrates a combination.